Victorian Hand-Crank Ice Cream Recipes from an Antique Cook Book

Victorian Hand-Crank Ice Cream Recipes from an Antique Cook Book

The following Victorian hand-crank ice cream maker recipes are from The Table: How to Buy Food, How to Cook It, and How to Serve it, by Alessandro Filippini, 1889. Alessandro Filippini was the chef of the world famous Delmonico’s in New York. And if you thought that Victorian ice cream flavors were limited to vanilla, chocolate or strawberry, read on!

Vanilla Ice Cream

Boil in a saucepan one pint of milk with half a vanilla-bean; put in a vessel half a pound of powdered sugar, and six egg yolks, and with a spatula mix thoroughly for ten minutes; then add it to the boiling milk, stirring for two minutes longer, and pour the whole into a copper basin, placing it on a moderate stove to heat for five minutes, stirring at the bottom continually with the spatula, and being careful not to let it boil. Remove from off the fire, place it on a table, and add immediately one pint of sweet cream, still mixing it for two minutes more; let cool off for thirty minutes, then strain through a sieve into an ice-cream freezer; put on the lid, and lay it in an ice-cream tub, filling the freezer all round with broken ice, mixed slightly with rock-salt; then turn the handle on the cover as briskly as possible for three minutes. Lift up the lid, and with a wooden spoon detach the ice cream from all around the freezer, and the bottom as well. Re-cover it, and turn the handle sharply for three minutes more; uncover, and detach the cream the same as before, being careful that no ice or salt drops in. Put the lid on, and repeat the same three times more. The ice-cream should by this time be quite firm, so have a cold dessert-dish with a folded napkin, dress the ice-cream over, and send to the table.

This same ice-cream can be formed into a single brick by having a brick-shaped form, filling it with the ice cream, and pressing it down quickly with a spoon; cover closely, being careful that the form is completely filled, so that no salted water can penetrate into it. Put broken ice at the bottom of a pail, mixing in a little rock-salt, lay the form on top, covering it entirely with broken ice and salt; let freeze for one hour, remove, and bathe it in a vessel containing lukewarm water; wash off the ice and salt that adhere, and lift it out as quickly as possible; remove the cover, and turn it on a dessert-dish with a folded napkin, lift up the mold, and send the ice-cream to the table.

Chocolate Ice Cream

Prepare and cook exactly the same as for vanilla ice cream; put in a saucepan two ounces of well-chopped cocoa and an ounce of powdered sugar, add to it half the cream preparation; place the pan on the stove, and with a pastry-whip stir briskly, and let boil for three minutes; take it from the fire, add it to the remaining half of cream, then mix the whole well together for two minutes. Strain through a fine sieve into an ice-cream freezer, let cool for thirty minutes, then proceed to freeze it exactly the same as for the vanilla ice cream, and serve it also the same.

Coffee Ice Cream

Put in a vessel half a pound of powdered sugar and six egg yolks; mix well with the spatula for ten minutes, then add one pint of boiling milk, stir for two minutes longer, and pour the whole into a copper basin; place it on the hot stove, and with the spatula stir gently at the bottom until well heated, but it must not boil. Take from off the fire, set it on a table, then immediately add a pint of sweet cream, mixing again for two minutes, and throw in two ounces of freshly ground Mocha coffee, stirring for two minutes longer; return the basin to the stove, beat it up again with the pastry-whip, and lay it on the table once more. Cover with a napkin, so that the coffee can infuse thoroughly for half an hour, then strain through a fine sieve into the freezer, and proceed freezing, and serving exactly the same as for vanilla ice cream.

Strawberry Ice Cream

Prepare and proceed exactly the same as for the coffee ice-cream, suppressing the coffee, and when the cream is cooked and cool, add half a pint of well picked and cleaned strawberries. Mix well with the spatula for two minutes, then strain through a fine sieve into the freezer, pressing the strawberries through with a wooden spoon; remove the sieve, cover the freezer, and proceed to freeze, and serve precisely the same as for vanilla ice-cream.

Pistachio Ice Cream

Have two ounces of fine, dried pistachio nuts, using only the best quality; put them into a pie-plate, place it in the oven to let the nuts get a light brown color, which will take about six minutes; remove from the oven, lay the pistaches in a mortar with one ounce of granulated sugar, and pound slightly. Have a cream preparation exactly the same as for coffee ice cream, suppressing the coffee. When cooked, add the pint of sweet cream and the pistache, then place it on the stove and heat well, stirring continually. Remove from the fire, cover the basin with a napkin, and let get thoroughly cool for thirty minutes. Add three drops of orange-flower water and five drops of spinach-green, mix the whole well for two minutes, then strain through a fine sieve into the freezer, and proceed to freeze and serve exactly the same as for vanilla ice cream.

Peach Ice Cream

Put in a vessel half a pound of powdered sugar with six egg yolks, then mix well with the spatula for ten minutes; add a pint of boiling milk, stir for two minutes longer, and pour the whole into a copper basin. Place it on a hot stove, and heat it thoroughly, stirring continually, but not letting it boil; remove, lay it on the table, and mix in immediately one pint of sweet cream; then leave it to cool for thirty minutes. Have six ripe, fine, sound peaches, wipe them nicely, cut them in two, remove the stones, then mash them into the cream, mixing thoroughly for three minutes; strain through a fine sieve into a freezer, pressing the peaches through with a wooden spoon, then proceed to freeze, and serve precisely the same as for the vanilla ice cream.

Banana Ice Cream

Prepare and proceed exactly the same as for the peach ice-cream, using four peeled, sound, and ripe bananas instead of the peaches, and finishing exactly the same as for the other.

Lemon Ice Cream

Put half a pound of powdered sugar into a basin; grate in the rind of two fine lemons, add four egg whites, and mix well with a wire whip for two minutes, then add a pint of cold milk, stirring again for one minute. Place the basin on the hot stove, stir briskly with the whip, and take it off when coming to a boil, lay it on the table, and pour in a pint of sweet cream, mixing well for two minutes. Let it get cool during half an hour, then strain through a fine sieve into a freezer, and finish precisely the same as for vanilla ice cream.

Red Victorian Rose Clip Art

A free A lovely red rose clip art image from a Victorian scrapbook. The rose has an open bloom and two buds that eagerly await your crafting touch.

Victorian Rose Clip Art

Click on the image for a larger version of the red rose illustration that you can download free!

Hathor, Anubis, Sekhmet, and Canopic Jars: Egyptian Clip Art

In celebration of Howard Carter’s birthday, I offer a selection of free Egyptian clip art images.

I’ve been interested in Egyptian art and history since I was very young. I was in grade school when the 1st exhibition of King Tutankhamen’s booty made the rounds in the late 1970s, but unfortunately failed to convince my folks to take me to New York to see the show at the Met. They did, however, give to me many books on Egypt that I still own, and for many years my mother would take me to the University of Penn Museum for my birthday.

Today Google, by way of their “Google Doodle”, informed me that today is the birthday of Howard Carter, the co-discover of King Tutankhamen’s tomb. And so in tribute of that obscure tit-bit, here are a few image selections from my copy of The Story of the Pharaohs by Rev. James Baikie, F.R.A.S., 1917. Click on the images for larger versions that can be used as free clip art.

Egyptian clipart of the goddess Hathor

Hathor of Denderah

Hathor of Denderah, the Godddess of Pleasure and Joy, pictured as a woman whose face is surrounded by broad plaits of hair, and who wears cow’s ears, or who bears a head-dress consisting of two horns with the solar disc between them.

Egyptian Clipart Anubis

Anubis

Anubis, the God of Departing Souls, was typified under the form of the jackal which haunts the cemeteries.

Egyptian Clipart Goddess Sekhmet

Sekhmet

Sekhmet, portrayed as a lioness,  represented the destroying heat of the sun.

Canopic Jars

Canopic jars contained and protected the viscera that was removed from the deceased during the mummification process.  The four children of Horus represented on the jars above are Amset, Hapi, Tuamautef, and Qebhesennuf.

If you enjoy vintage images, be sure to become a “fan” of the Miss Mary page on Facebook to find out when the newest images are added to this site.

 

Lorrimer Hair Tonic Ad

A thick mane of hair is the promise of this Victorian hair tonic advertisement that appeared in the December 1898 issue of The People’s Home Journal. Upon receipt of just 2 cents, L. Lorrimer & Co of Baltimore, Maryland would send “full information” on “how to grow hair upon the baldest head, stop hair falling, cure weak eyebrows and eyelashes, scurf, etc., and restore faded hair to its natural color.

Victorian beauty ad for a hair tonic by L. Lorrimer & Co, published in the December 1898 issue of The People's Home Journal

Victorian beauty ad for a hair tonic by L. Lorrimer & Co, published in the December 1898 issue of The People’s Home Journal.

Click on the image for a larger version of the same.

Beware! This is One Powerful Witch!

Beware! This is One Powerful Witch!

Vintage Halloween postcard with a pretty witch holding her broom aloft, although here it looks as if she is more interested in shooing away the bats than she is on riding it. Notice the candle with the profile of a man.

The postcard reads:

I’ts best beware
Of the Witching hour
In which the Witches
Show their power. 

A scan from my collection of antique postcards, I hope that you find it useful! I’m on Facebook, like my Miss Mary page to find out when more great free clip art is added to this site.

Free vintage Halloween postcard clipart witching hour

Click the image for a larger version that you can use as free Halloween clip art.

 

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